Tag: Millennials

ILTM China x The Luxury Conversation: Travel Report – Affluent Chinese Families

ILTM (International Luxury Travel Market) China will be in Shanghai on October the 31st to November the 2nd, 2018. This is the first dedicated Chinese edition of the world’s leading luxury travel-industry event, as the Chinese market is now so strong that the region warrants its own unique version.

At the event’s keynote speech on the 31st, Chloe Reuter, CEO & Founder of Reuter Communications and co-Founder of The Luxury Conversation will be presenting findings from a new travel report on Affluent Chinese Families.

The report, co-published by ILTM China and The Luxury Conversation, is produced by Reuter : Intelligence, the insights division of Reuter Communications. Continue reading “ILTM China x The Luxury Conversation: Travel Report – Affluent Chinese Families”

Move Over Millennials – Chinese Gen X are Just as Sexy

by Nick Withycombe

Millennials, yes fine. We get it. All of us have referenced the Chinese Millennial so often that the syllables may have lost all meaning by now, becoming some sort of ritualesque mantra chanted out on a weekly basis at the latest ‘can’t miss’ China expert panel discussion.

But what about Gen X? They matter too! They may be a little older, they may not be quite as sleek-sounding and the ‘Gen X mindset’ doesn’t seem quite as sexy (more like slippers and a good book), but logically speaking they are a crucial segment of consumer demographic. Continue reading “Move Over Millennials – Chinese Gen X are Just as Sexy”

China’s New ‘Wonder Dads’ Go Big on Luxury for All the Family

We’ve told you about China’s self-declared Spicy Mamas – and the face of modern fatherhood in China is also one that distinctly differs from past generations. Luxury brands and new media platforms in China are finding that China’s affluent, modern Dad is keen to be seen as part of the successful family unit. Continue reading “China’s New ‘Wonder Dads’ Go Big on Luxury for All the Family”

China’s ‘Hot Mamas’: Millennial Parents, The New Force in Luxury Spending

By Jiaqi Luo and Nick Withycombe

The development of China in the last decade is most easily visible through big numbers. But stats such as ‘Chinese travelling overseas increased by 1,380% from 2000 to 2017‘ don’t help to understand the intricate changes in society that have taken place. One of these enormous (seismic, tectonic, however far you want to go) changes is in the new parenting culture of China’s affluent Millennial generation. Continue reading “China’s ‘Hot Mamas’: Millennial Parents, The New Force in Luxury Spending”

The Walpole International Marketing Seminar, London: Affluent Chinese Consumers & Millennial Mindsets

By Francesca Fearon
Today, China dominates the conversation of every luxury marketing event because of the sheer numbers involved. The allure of the Chinese consumer especially the Millennials with their taste for fashion and luxury cannot be ignored by prestige brands and was the core topic at a recent marketing seminar in London hosted by Walpole, an association of over 200 British luxury brands.
 
Invited to discuss this important group of mobile young Chinese consumers was Chloé Reuter, Founder and CEO of Reuter Communications (and co-Founder of The Luxury Conversation). She joined a panel discussion that included Michael Ward, Chairman of Walpole and managing director of Harrods and Katie Thomas, Associate Director of the Bond Street Association.

Continue reading “The Walpole International Marketing Seminar, London: Affluent Chinese Consumers & Millennial Mindsets”

5 Questions with OOAK’s Alice Xu; Succeeding in China with omni-channel boutique fashion

Having begun in 2012 and now with over 230,000 followers on Taobao, a new Tmall store and the OOAK Concept Boutique, OOAK (One Of A Kind shopping experience) has realised the retailer’s ideal of a multi-faceted brand which features both Western and Chinese designers, even creating their own branded jewellery in the process.

We spoke to the Founder of OOAK, Alice Xu, about the journey. Continue reading “5 Questions with OOAK’s Alice Xu; Succeeding in China with omni-channel boutique fashion”

How YSL Picked Up a Social Lipstick Trend in China – and Won

By Jiaqi Luo

In a modern world of diversity, cross-cultural interchange and rapidly evolving societies, it remains fair to say: women love lipstick. In the west, the term “lipstick effect” was born; when disposable income drops during a time of economic crisis, lipstick sales rise. Women love lipstick because it is an affordable product that instantly feels luxurious and increases their confidence level. (editor’s safety note – the writer is a woman!) Continue reading “How YSL Picked Up a Social Lipstick Trend in China – and Won”

Luxury Conversation Paris Briefing: The Real Life of China’s Most Beloved KOL

By Susan Owens

Prestige European fashion brands embracing the power of KOLs (Key Opinion Leaders) are swiftly mastering the art of reaching out to the world’s fastest-growing luxury consumers – Chinese Millennials.

But for many brands, mystique still surrounds the power of the Chinese KOL. While Influencer Marketing in the west is within their comfort zone, the clear barriers of not only language and culture but a fully individual digital eco-system can cause a lack of clear understanding.

The Luxury Conversation’s Paris breakfast briefing (following recent London and New York briefings) to an audience of 50 invitation-only guests set out to demystify this subject with an intimate tête-à-tête at the House of Tai Ping Showroom in Paris.

Continue reading “Luxury Conversation Paris Briefing: The Real Life of China’s Most Beloved KOL”

How (Not) to Be Culturally Appropriate to Chinese Luxury Consumers

“Why do luxury brands misunderstand us?”

“How come luxury brands interpret the Chinese aesthetic this way?”

“Let’s see which brand has the ugliest Year of the Dog edition product!”

These comments are just some examples of recent titles from popular WeChat/Weibo posts. They are from Chinese Millennials mocking some luxury brands’ Year of the Dog collections. Chinese consumers were not only shocked, but disappointed by the poor Chinese aesthetics produced by big-name fashion houses. Continue reading “How (Not) to Be Culturally Appropriate to Chinese Luxury Consumers”